Image 1 of 1

UZBEKISTAN_samarkand_shah_i_zinda_necropolis_locals_by_maria_sahai.JPG

Add to Cart Add to Lightbox Download
Shah-I-Zinda necropolis in Samarkand is one of the oldest and longest-running examples of a continually constructed historic site in the world. The name Shah-i-Zinda (meaning "The living king") is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet Muhammad was buried there. In the 7th century he came to Samarkand with Arab invasion to preach Islam. The legend says that he was beheaded for his faith. But he took his head and went into the deep well, where he's still living now.
Copyright
Maria Sahai (c)
Image Size
4588x3059 / 6.2MB
Contained in galleries
Along Uzbekistan's Silk Road
Shah-I-Zinda necropolis in Samarkand is one of the oldest and longest-running examples of a continually constructed historic site in the world. The name Shah-i-Zinda (meaning "The living king") is connected with the legend that Kusam ibn Abbas, the cousin of the prophet Muhammad was buried there. In the 7th century he came to Samarkand with Arab invasion to preach Islam. The legend says that he was beheaded for his faith. But he took his head and went into the deep well, where he's still living now.